Friday, 03 March 2017

Engineering for Peace

Written by 
Bridget ShopHello, my name is Bridget. I’m an engineering undergraduate student at University of St. Thomas and have the great fortune of being an engineering intern at Compatible Technology International (CTI) for this spring and summer term. CTI works with primarily women farmers who are experiencing poverty to increase their efficiency, decrease the drudgery, and collaboratively create pathways out of hunger through technology. The internship is for credit in my program "Peace Engineering," but more so it is an opportunity to be involved in the field of engineering I’ve always wanted to do. I believe engineering can change the world – not just by creating cool gadgets, but by meaningfully changing lives as CTI does.

We are taught in engineering how to look at the big picture and account for all effects on a system. Often this is constrained to physical products (bridges, cars, computers, etc), but engineers have the potential to see the whole system: the social system. Seeing the contextual social, economic, and environmental factors allows for more sustainable and personal design. More importantly it allows for humble and respectful service of designing with those economically disadvantaged. This is what I view my purpose in studying engineering to be, service. Service to respect and respond to the dignity of all persons. Service that works together with farmers to design what is best for them through collaboration. Service that aims at greater justice and empowerment for women which will result in a more peaceful world. I’m excited to work with CTI because I have seen how they use engineering design, data, and theory to touch lives and empower communities.

Now I know that we can’t give all the credit to engineering. The work CTI does requires gender specialists, financial supporters, manufacturing partners, and more! But I hope to share with you the engineering side of the story here on my blog. How we design for the worker and the community. How we improve for sustainability during a day’s work. And other reflections of technical work impacting life in very human ways: medically, socially, economically, etc. Engineering doesn’t have to be cold, anti-social, and analytical as is often the stereotype in media and society. Engineering can be personal and contemplative to bring life, justice, and peace.

While at CTI, I look forward to being involved in a number of diverse tasks. I will be a resource for the engineering team for computer drafting of designs in Solidworks. I will do research for best practices and existing designs for new challenges as well as assist in the fabrication of prototypes. Right now, I am analyzing data for the crank handle tools for my first project. But no matter what I’m working on, I always want to keep it in the context that the work will serve others, and I hope you will join me.

You can find the latest updates from Bridget here. 

bridgetthumbBridget is an undergraduate student at the University of St. Thomas (UST) in the Peace Engineering program, and an engineering intern at Compatible Technology. She has a life-long passion for service, social justice and fighting poverty and hunger. When she found another passion in engineering, creativity and design, she became inspired to combine them. Now, she is grateful of the opportunities at UST and CTI to develop the social and technical skills to pursue her passions.
Last modified on Monday, 06 March 2017

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