Thursday, 30 May 2013

Gates Foundation Backs our “Bold Idea”

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We are thrilled to announce that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded CTI a Grand Challenges Explorations Grant, an award that supports innovative and bold ideas that take on persistent health and development challenges. With backing from the Gates Foundation, CTI will deliver its new Pearl Millet Processing Tools to villages in rural Senegal for long-term evaluation and impact monitoring.

The award marks the culmination of years of effort developing a suite of tools that can significantly increase grain production in the most impoverished regions of the world.

Post-harvest grain loss is a major contributor to global hunger and poverty. Approximately $4 billion dollars of grain is lost after harvest in Sub-Saharan Africa every year—that’s equivalent to the entire amount of food aid sent to the region during the past decade.

CTI’s manually-operated pearl millet stripper, thresher, winnower and grinder can help farmers rapidly produce pearl millet grain with much less food waste. During field tests in Mali and Senegal, women and girls told us that the tools were a “blessing,” a “godsend” and an answer to their prayers. Now it’s time for us to gather scientific data about the wider economic and social impact that improved grain processing can have on a rural community. Precisely how much grain can communities save? How will women spend their freed time? We hope to answer these and other questions this fall, when we launch the tools in several rural Senegalese villages. Check our website for updates on our progress, and watch this video to see our tools in action.

Why Pearl Millet?

MilletPearl millet may just be the most important food crop you’ve never heard of. About 500 million people depend on this nutritious and drought-tolerant grain for their livelihoods. It’s a particularly important food source in West Africa, but it’s also notoriously difficult to process into edible grain. Traditionally, women and girls spend hours each day processing their pearl millet grain by breaking it apart in a mortar & pestle and winnowing it in the wind—an extremely wasteful practice. For these women, more efficient grain tools represent more than just additional food; they represent freedom from hours of daily drudgery and time to go to school, grow more crops or start a business—these tools are a major step towards profoundly improving lives.

We would like to thank the many volunteers, collaborators and donors that have supported our grain processing innovations, including the John P. and Eleanor R. Yackel Foundation, NCBA/CLUSA, and many more generous organizations and individuals!

 

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