AngelaKuan profile“My Life has been difficult, but all the work I have done for my community has been worth it,” says 71-year-old Angela Kuan. This woman has led numerous projects that have built schools, roads, and water systems in Siares, a rural community in the mountains of Nicaragua.

Her latest project? Guaranteeing that every family in her village is drinking clean, safe water.

Angela is the Coordinator of her village’s Water and Sanitation Committee. She mobilized her community to purchase CTI’s Water Chlorinator in an effort to prevent the diarrhea and disease that frequently occurred from drinking untreated water. This inexpensive system attaches to a village water tank and uses chlorine tablets to disinfect an entire community’s drinking water source.

Angela and her neighbors shared the $200 (USD) cost of purchasing the chlorinator, and CTI staff trained Angela and other community volunteers to assemble and operate the system. Families in the community chip in a few cents each month to buy new chlorine tablets, and the system is regularly maintained by the local Water and Sanitation Committee.

Angela’s community of 1,500 now has clean drinking water.

What does this mean for Siares? Angela explains, “Before the chlorinator, you would see up to 2 children being buried because of diarrhea [each year]. Now the chlorinator has decreased sickness in our community, it has changed the lives of our people. I am happy to see the impact, children are being raised in a better environment.”AngelaKuan interview

Angela stresses that this success wouldn’t be possible without the support of CTI. She explains that prior to installing CTI’s Chlorinator, Siares tried other water treatment systems—but none of them stuck. Unlike the CTI Chlorinator, other technologies frequently rely on power sources that aren’t practical in rural communities, and they did not constantly clean the water. Because of its simplicity and effectiveness, rural villages can maintain and operate CTI’s Chlorinator with ease—which explains why CTI’s clean water project in Siares has thrived where others failed.

“I will die satisfied with the work I have done,” Angela stated proudly, “It has been an honor to do what I have done for my community,”

Angela’s passion and generosity have improved the lives of hundreds of men, women, and children in her village. And thanks to dedicated community members and support from CTI donors, more than 400,000 people across Nicaragua are drinking clean safe, water.


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Adrian Diaz graduated from Northland College in May 2016. He double majored in Sustainable Community Development and Sociology with a Social Justice Emphasis. After finishing his internship with CTI, Adrian plans on applying to law school in the Twin Cities area, and becoming a human rights or immigration attorney.

 

Published in Water

Doña Aurela is a community leader in Nicaragua who volunteers with the CAPS to maintain her village’s potable water. CAPS (Comite de Agua Potable y Saniemento or Potable Water and Sanitation Committee) is a national organization of formal village water committees common in rural communities, where many villages lack any form of water treatment. CTI partners with CAPS throughout Nicaragua, and trains them to install and maintain our Water Chlorinators, which provide entire villages with safe water for pennies per day.

“Safe water is a prerequisite to ending poverty.”

What motivates these men and women to give their time, energy, and money to establish safe water in their villages? There are many reasons, but as Doña Aurela explains in the video above, safe water is an essential prerequisite to building healthier communities and economic growth.

This week, CTI and our partners at EOS International and Self Help International are hosting an inaugural Clean Water Conference in the capital city of Managua. We’re gathering CAPS leaders from villages across Nicaragua, as well as officials from the National Ministry of Health, Mayor’s Offices, and other non-governmental development organizations. We are meeting to discuss the state of potable water in rural villages, how each of us contributes to addressing the challenges, and ways we can strengthen and expand our partnership nationally.

And if you believe that access to safe water is a fundamental right everyone should have, you can help us realize that vision. Click on the image below to make a donation, and your gift will be matched—today only!

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Published in Central America

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Over the past four years, CTI has been on a mission to provide safe water to rural communities in Nicaragua. We teamed up with more than 400 villages to install CTI’s Water Chlorinator, and today, we are proud to announce that more than 250,000 people have gained clean drinking water for the first time in their history.

This is the culmination of a goal we set in 2011, when CTI’s water chlorinators were in just over 40 communities. We built a team with hundreds of village volunteers, officials from the Nicaraguan Health Ministries, NGO partners, and together, village-by-village, we’ve been spreading clean, safe water and empowering community leaders.

The results? Kids are full of life and in school, parents are healthy and productive, and waterborne illness has “disappeared” according to local Health Ministries in the areas where we’re working.

I want to thank the Pentair Foundation, Project Redwood, Rotary clubs, and countless donors for their support and dedication to the fundamental right to safe water. We are on track to double our impact over the next few years, and by 2018, we will empower half a million people in Nicaragua with improved health and more prosperous communities.

Onward!
Alexandra Spieldoch, CTI Executive Director

 

Published in Chlorinator
Tuesday, 18 February 2014

The Most Powerful Tool of All

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CTI’s most valuable tool is not a grinder, nor a chlorinator, but it is something that can’t be built. In Nicaragua, CTI has spent many years BUILDING TRUST while installing our Water Chlorinators. By partnering with volunteer water committees in Nicaragua, CTI trains villages to install and maintain chlorinators to control the harmful bacteria in water. Together, CTI and Nicaraguan communities are eliminating waterborne illness while building strong collaborative relationships based on mutual trust and respect.

On a recent trip with CTI to Nicaragua, members of Project Redwood directly experienced the implementation of CTI’s work and saw the power of this partnership in action. Project Redwood is a foundation of the Stanford Business School Class of 1980 that supports international development projects that mitigate the causes and effects of poverty.

Project Redwood members reported that CTI infuses enthusiasm, respectfulness, passion, and dedication to clean drinking water among the extraordinary Nicaraguan people — and in the process they create a bond of trust. As one traveler wrote, “The positive and respectful relationship shared by CTI and local water committees is fundamental in the adoption of CTI’s systems in Nicaragua.” This relationship makes CTI’s Water Chlorinator all the more effective because technologies are only truly appropriate when there is trust between those who build it and those who use it.

With the great relationships between CTI and Nicaraguan villages comes more opportunity to reach CTI’s goal of providing clean drinking water to 250,000 Nicaraguans by the summer of 2014. Severe rural poverty and the prevalence of water-borne illnesses remain a threat to these communities, but CTI’s Water Chlorinator makes water safe and that is key to their health, vitality, and opportunity. Project Redwood’s experience confirms that livelihoods can improve with great technology and trust.

To find out more about Project Redwood’s experience with CTI in Nicaragua, read their blogs here.

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Sorcha Douglas is an intern from Macalester College, studying International Studies with a concentration in International Development and a minor in Environmental Studies.

 

 

 

Published in Water

According to the 2006 United Nations Human Development Report, close to half of all people in developing countries are suffering at any given time from a health problem caused by water and sanitation deficits. For children under age five, water-related diseases are the leading causes of death with1.8 million children dying each year from diarrhea – 4,900 deaths each day. The World Health Organization has stated that no intervention has greater overall impact upon national development and public health than the provision of safe drinking water and the proper disposal of human waste. 

Compatible Technology International began development of a water chlorinator in 2002 after being contacted by the Nicaraguan government for help in correcting the badly contaminated water systems in the rural areas of that country.  The CTI 8 is a simple, unique water chlorinator(see photo below) that focuses on delivering clean water to rural communities with low to medium flow water systems that do not have access to water treatment or electricity, and have minimal economic resources.  Most water systems are designed for larger communities and are more costly to implement.  

The CTI 8 Water Chlorinator was initially installed in about 30 communities in Nicaragua under the direct supervision of Nicaraguan Water Ministry personnel. Unfortunately, a combination of issues arose that caused the water project to stall for a couple of years.  We were unable to obtain the necessary chlorine tablets and the Nicaraguan Water Ministry disbanded the office which had been supervising the CTI 8 installations. 

In 2009 CTI restarted the Water Chlorinator Project with the help of the Nicaragua Department of Health, who has committed their hygienists, employed by the Department of Health, to participate in this project at the Department’s expense. CTI has contracted with an epidemiologist in Nicaragua to restart the project.  He has visited all of the original installations and was pleasantly surprised to find that the vast majority of them had been maintained by the original water committees and were just waiting for the necessary chlorine tablets to make them operational once again. 

In addition to the CTI representative, the hygienists will be a valuable component of the project, as they live in the municipalities, know the rural communities, work in health in those communities, and have community health education around water as part of their responsibilities. The distance and location of the chlorinators in rural communities make the use of the hygienists important, as they are able to monitor the chlorinator installations as part of their daily work, eliminating the need for difficult and constant travel to monitor the installations.  While we are actively searching for a chlorine tablet supplier in Central America, a shipment of tablets was delivered from the US this month and we are awaiting word that at least some of the installations have been reactivated. 

The intent is to have this project be self sustaining within a year through the sale of the chlorine tablets and chlorinator systems, but until that time we are continuing to seek funds to support the work we are doing in Nicaragua. 

Published in Central America

In early 2002, the Nicaraguan government contacted CTI and asked us to investigate the possibility of correcting the badly contaminated water systems in the rural areas of that country.  CTI responded by engaging Americas Committee volunteers Fred Jacob (noted community organizer with a Nicaraguan NGO) and Charles Taflin (Senior Engineer with the Minneapolis Water Department) to design and implement a water disinfection system.  Thus, the CTI 8 water chlorinator was created.

The chlorinator was initially installed in about 30 communities in Nicaragua under the direct supervision of Nicaraguan Water Ministry personnel.  This simple chlorinator allows the people and communities where it is installed to have access to disinfected drinking water for pennies per day.  Unfortunately, due to political issues in Nicaragua, the dissolution of the Nicaraguan Water Ministry, and challenges securing appropriate chlorine tablets, the project has been less active than desirable the last few years.

However, in recent months, the National Health Ministry has been given jurisdiction over rural water and has been in communication with CTI to reinstate the water chlorinator program.  That, along with a recent breakthrough in obtaining the proper chlorine tablets, prompted Fred Jacob to visit Nicaragua last month where he checked on the chlorinators that had been installed by CTI a few years ago.  What he found was encouraging!  Fred reports, “It was heartwarming to see that most of the chlorinators and water systems were in acceptable to wonderful condition!”

CTI is actively forging ahead with this project and is working towards the goal of making 50 chlorinators fully operational within 90 days!

Published in Central America