WomensPlatform

Who makes sure the fridge is fully stocked? Who packs the kids’ lunch for school? Who does most of the cooking? Around the world, women are still doing the bulk of food prep. Nowhere is this more apparent than sub-Saharan Africa, where women contribute up to 80 percent of food production. This work is primarily done by hand—a process both laborious and time-consuming.

Women in countries like Senegal have limited access to tools that could reduce their labor and improve their productivity.

These women are in charge of food preparation for their families and communities. But the time- and labor-saving technologies women need are rarely developed with their input. Furthermore, women lack access to finances and other resources that would help them access new technologies.

To give women a seat at the table, CTI organized a national forum of women farmer leaders in Dakar, Senegal. The forum, which took place in August 2015, was attended by women leaders from across the country, investors, manufacturers, and government officials. Attendees discussed common challenges for women farmers, and opportunities for women to benefit from appropriate tools and training.

Published in West Africa

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Wesley Meier, CTI Program Director

A common and very important theme that echoed during the 2014 World Food Prize was the untapped potential of women in agriculture. Pamela Anderson, the Director of Agriculture at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation pointed out that 2 out of 3 women in Africa are employed in agriculture, and it’s women who responsible for 90% of grueling post-harvest processing work.

If women had equal access to credit, land, inputs, markets as men, we would be able to increase agricultural productivity by 20%.

One of the biggest constraints faced by women, according to Anderson, is labor. Reducing women’s labor is a major focus of Compatible Technology International, and we’ve seen how easing the burden on women farmers can increase their yields, improve the quality of the food they produce, and help them better market and sell their crops.

But while improving women’s access to technologies and resources is important, access alone is not enough to make a lasting difference. The gender gap is deeper and broader than we thought, Anderson noted, and we need to continue studying it and addressing the topic through technologies and policy.

Published in Uncategorized
Saturday, 12 May 2012

The Power of Women and Mothers

When we meet women who’ve acquired our tools, one of the first questions we ask them is, “How did you spend your new income?” Universally, across all countries, continents, religions and cultures, women tell us that they invested their income in caring for their children.

We may provide them with the opportunity, but it’s the mothers who decide to invest in their children’s education, their health and nutrition. And that is why we sincerely believe that a mother’s love is key to ending hunger and poverty.

Watch Kathleen Graham, CTI volunteer, international development consultant, and a mom, speak about amazing women she’s seen generate peace and development in their communities.

Published in Uncategorized