PHASE III OF McKNIGHT FOUNDATION FUNDED PROJECT LAUNCHED IN MALAWI

Advancing the Development and Adoption of Post-Harvest Grain Legume Technologies by Smallholder Farmers in Malawi and Tanzania

Compatible Technology International (CTI), on 5th February, 2018, launched the third phase of a McKnight Foundation funded project “Advancing the Development and Adoption of Post-Harvest Grain Legume Technologies by Smallholder Farmers in Malawi and Tanzania”.

The project, which aims to improve competitiveness and livelihoods of smallholder grain legume producers in Malawi and Tanzania, through the development of labor-saving technologies has in the past two phases introduced groundnut post-harvest handling tools, including a lifter, stripper and sheller to smallholder farmers in Malawi and Tanzania.

The previous two phases also involved gathering data on the technologies impact on gender, efficiency as well as farmers’ willingness and ability to adopt the technologies. Currently, many smallholder farmers both in groups and individuals, who have bought the machines have reported a massive reduction in physical drudgery associated with groundnut production, as well as reduction in post-harvest losses, among others.

The third phase of the project, which runs up to 2020, aims to promote adoption of groundnut post-harvest technologies and other grain crops. Among others, CTI aim to leverage on National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM)’s farmer networks to launch Food Technology Centers (FTC), which will create market and business opportunities for smallholder farmers, especially youth and women, in Malawi.

Through the FTC, farmers will have access to food processing technologies, as well as training related to production, post-harvest handling and sale of value added products to local markets. The FTC will include a targeted effort to women’s groups and capacity building among the youth leading to job creation.

CTI also aims to develop more post-harvest innovations for other key legumes in Malawi, like soybeans, pigeon peas and sweet beans. Research will be conducted to establish how the additional technologies can help reduce labor constraints, improve food quality and eventually contribute to improving smallholder farmers’ livelihood.

The project has a research component which will assess the demand for legumes post-harvest technologies among smallholder farmers in Tanzania, also included are demonstration sessions and field based farmer- evaluation of selected tools.

The launched was followed by a one-day planning meeting, during which CTI and partner organizations including the International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) Farmers Union of Malawi (FUM) and NASFAM developed a revised theory of change based on the concept of Farmer Research Network (FRN). Participants also reviewed the project’s previous Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) plan as well as the project work plan.



Part of the participants to the inception and work planning meeting
Published in Groundnuts
nutritionMalawi is one of the most malnourished countries in the world. In this small southeast African country, about the size of Ohio, malnutrition typically starts during childhood as a result of micronutrient deficiencies, a diet comprised of mostly cereals, and food shortages. Chronic malnutrition causes stunting in children, and those who survive it often deal with lifelong health and cognitive development challenges. The lasting effects of undernutrition impacts 60% of Malawi’s adults and cost the economy millions of dollars each year.

But that’s only a part of Malawi’s story. In recent years, Malawi has made major strides in reducing child mortality (down 80% since 1990) and the prevalence of HIV. Malawi is nicknamed “the warm heart of Africa” and it’s full of incredibly resilient communities working together to improve life for everyone. And it’s paying off.

At CTI, we’re equipping communities with tools that will help them produce more peanuts—one of the most nutritious foods on the planet. And we’re partnering with farmer co-ops and researchers in Malawi so families have nutritious, high-yielding seed varieties. Together, and with the support of our donors, we are helping communities boost their yields and diversify their diets so families are healthier and kids can look forward to brighter futures.

5 Things You Should Know about Child Nutrition in Malawi 

1) 23% percent of all child mortality cases in Malawi are associated with undernutrition

2) Today, 1.4 million or almost half of the children in Malawi are stunted

3) 66% of the adult population engaged in manual activities were stunted as children, representing an annual loss of US$ 67 million

4) Of all school year repetitions, 18 percent are associated with stunting

5) The total annual costs associated with child undernutrition are estimated at US$ 597 million, equivalent to 10.3% of GDP

Published in blog

Aflatoxins are the most toxic naturally occurring carcinogens known.

Aflatoxins are poisonous, cancer-causing chemicals that develop from mold and fungus, often as a result of improper storage and mishandled food. In many parts of Africa, aflatoxin contamination poses a serious risk to the health of rural communities. It’s also a major barrier to their ability to market their crops and earn a profit. 

Engineers at CTI are working in partnership with crop researchers at ICRISAT to develop a testing kit to help farmers and researchers identify aflatoxin in peanuts. ICRISAT has created a simple strip test that develops an easy to read black line to indicate if the peanuts are safe to eat.  CTI is researching simple, low cost technologies that can be adapted to chop the peanuts into a suitable sample size for testing. With a low-cost, field- testing kit, farmers can identify aflatoxin contamination at its source, in minutes, and mitigate a major threat to rural health and incomes.
Published in blog